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Question: Assume that an official draft of a new, codified Constitution of the United Kingdom is complete, except for one matter. The drafters have to decide what to do about constitutional conventions.

Explain with reasons the main course of action open to them, and indicate which course you think would be best.

Answer: This question requires discussion of the codification of constitutional conventions. Conventions are, by their very nature, not the result of a legislative or a judicial process. Constitutional conventions are rules which arise...


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Details: - Mark: 67% | Course: Public Law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 1310 | References: Yes | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: December 05, 2010 | Coursework ID: 626

Question: ‘If the separation of powers was a reality in the British constitution, governmental and judicial arrangements would require major modification.’ Discuss.

Answer: The doctrine of Separation of Powers is fundamental to the constitution of most modern states. This doctrine states that, in order to prevent despotism or absolutism, power should not be concentrated in...


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Details: - Mark: 67% | Course: Public Law | Year: 1st | Words: 1379 | References: Yes | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: March 21, 2010 | Coursework ID: 598

Question: Judicial Review is concerned not with the decision but with the decision making process. Explain and evaluate this statement.

Answer: Judicial Review (JR) is a core element of administrative and public law. It is not available for private law disputes. JR is purely a judicial creation that was created by the courts...


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Details: - Mark: 67% | Course: Public Law | Year: 1st | Words: 2542 | References: Yes | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: September 29, 2008 | Coursework ID: 9

Question: ‘Any proposal for the reform of the composition of the House of Lords ought logically to begin by asking what it is we expect the House of Lords to do and to tailor composition to function.’ Discuss, giving an account of the existing forms of public business conducted by the House of Lords.

Answer: The upper house of the United Kingdom, its “revising and leisured legislature ”, is an unelected, democratically unaccountable institution. The origins of the House of Lords can be traced back to the...


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Details: - Mark: 66% | Course: Public Law | Year: 1st | Words: 1484 | References: Yes | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: April 09, 2009 | Coursework ID: 599

Question: Should the House of Lords be fully elected? How would election of the House of Lords affect its relationship with the House of Commons?

Answer: The UK legislature is bicameral, that is, comprising of two chambers: the House of Commons and the House of Lords. The House of Lords is the second chamber of the UK Houses...


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Details: - Mark: 66% | Course: Public Law | Year: 1st | Words: 1954 | References: Yes | Date written: December, 2004 | Date submitted: October 21, 2008 | Coursework ID: 169

Question: Discuss the Bancoult v Foreign Secretary (No2) in detail. Pay special attention to Lord Hoffmans judgement.

[First Year, Public Law, 2.1, UK LLB]

Answer: I INTRODUCTION The gross maltreatment of the Chagossians at the hands of the British did not shock me, nor did it even come as a surprise. Great Britain, or the ‘empire on...


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Details: - Mark: 65% | Course: Public Law | Year: 1st | Words: 1487 | References: Yes | Date written: February, 2016 | Date submitted: December 02, 2016 | Coursework ID: 996

Question: "With a perfect Lower House it is certain that an Upper House would be scarcely of any value ... But though beside an ideal House of Commons the Lords would be unnecessary, and therefore pernicious, beside the actual House a revising and leisured legislature is extremely useful." (Bagehot, 1867 as quoted in H Barnett, Constitutional and Administrative Law (10th ed, Routledge 2013) 363).

Discuss.

(Graded 2.1, Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) Standard)

Answer: This quote, from the 19th century British journalist Walter Bagehot\'s book The English Constitution, raises two fundamental questions about the nature of the UK\'s bicameral legislature. Firstly, whether or not the House...


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Details: - Mark: 65% | Course: Public Law | Year: 1st | Words: 1000 | References: Yes | Date written: December, 2014 | Date submitted: April 09, 2015 | Coursework ID: 913

Question: ‘A federal system for the UK is not only legally possible, it is politically inevitable.' Discuss.

Answer: Federalism is an organisation of government in which the authority to govern is divided between a central government on the one hand, and a number of constituent regions, provinces, states or other...


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Details: - Mark: 65% | Course: Public Law | Year: 1st | Words: 867 | References: No | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: November 24, 2014 | Coursework ID: 893

Question: Why and how has the policing of public protest changed in the last 25 years.

Answer: Historically political protests, demonstrations and riots were quite common in Britain. What was not common however, was a structured public service department equipped to deal with such events. This essay will purport...


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Details: - Mark: 65% | Course: Public Law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 2679 | References: Yes | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: February 20, 2009 | Coursework ID: 432

Question: “The only purpose for which power can be rightly exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others. His own good, either physical or moral, is not a sufficient warrant. … Over himself, over his own body and mind, the individual is sovereign. ” [John Stuart Mill, On Liberty] Critically discuss John Stuart Mill’s liberty principle with reference to the work of other jurists and, where relevant, to current political or legal events. To what extent do you think that the principle continues to influence modern debates about rights?

Answer: In order to critically examine this particular principle and its influence, it is necessary to look at the background of the principle so that it can be studied in context. John Stuart...


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Details: - Mark: 65% | Course: Public Law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 3565 | References: Yes | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: February 20, 2009 | Coursework ID: 429


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