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Question: Jack and Jill have been married for 4 years. Jill has a 7-year-old daughter from a previous relationship but has been unable to conceive a much longed for second child with Jack.

Over the past year, Jill has been drinking heavily and has become increasingly abusive and violent towards Jack while in this state. Jill typically accuses Jack of being a useless, impotent, failure who cannot give her a child and repeatedly goads him about her former partner’s sexual prowess and reproductive ability. Her violence towards Jack has escalated from punching and kicking him to biting him and beating him with whatever household item is closest to hand. Jack has responded to the various modes of assault by restraining her arms, pushing her away and trying to disarm her of whatever item she is using as a weapon.

On this last occasion of verbal abuse and violence, Jill has told him that she intended to go back to her previous partner, who she described as “a real man who knows how to satisfy a woman”. She then lunged blows at Jack’s head with her daughter’s hockey stick.

Furious and also in fear of violence, Jack “snapped”, tore the hockey stick out of her hands and brought it down repeatedly on Jill’s head until she collapsed on the sofa.

Consider Jack’s criminal liability and any defence(s) he may have in relation to BOTH possible outcomes set out below:

Outcome 1) As a result of Jack’s actions, Jill suffers a fractured skull and brain injury from which she dies
AND
Outcome 2) As a result of Jack’s actions, Jill suffers a fractured skull and brain injury but survives after medical treatment.

Answer: Outcome 1) To be liable for any homicide offence the defendant must cause the death of another human. The required actus reus of homicide as a result crime, is that the defendant’s...


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Details: - Mark: Not available | Course: Criminal Law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 1998 | References: Yes | Date written: January, 2019 | Date submitted: March 11, 2019 | Coursework ID: 1054

Question: “In an earlier part of this work stress was laid upon the essential distinction between the “law of the constitution,” which, consisting (as it does) of rules enforced or recognized by the Courts, makes up a body of “laws” in the proper sense of that term, and the “conventions of the constitution,” which consisting (as they do) of customs, practices, maxims, or precepts which are not enforced or recognized by the Courts, make up a body not of laws but of constitutional or political ethics…”
(A.V. Dicey Introduction to the study of the Law of the Constitution 1885, 8E 1915 Liberty Classics, page 277)

Explain, illustrate and comment on this distinction between “laws of the constitution” (“enforced or recognized by the courts”) and “conventions of the constitution” (“not enforced or recognized by the courts”). Discuss whether Dicey’s formulation of the distinction is so absolute that it fails to account effectively for the way constitutional conventions work in the modern UK constitution.

Answer: Constitutional conventions are the primary source of non-legal constitutional rules which govern constitutional behaviour and are considered binding to those whom they apply. Dicey discusses an essential distinction between formal constitutional laws...


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Details: - Mark: Not available | Course: Constitutional and Administrative Law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 1995 | References: Yes | Date written: January, 2019 | Date submitted: March 11, 2019 | Coursework ID: 1053

Question: Assignment Title: "The Differences between Continental Europe (Civil Law Legal System) Copyright Traditions and UK Copyright Traditions."

LW801: Intellectual Property 1: Copyright and Breach of Confidence, University of Kent

Table of Contents
Introduction 3
Background 3
Critical Approach 6
UK Legal System (Common Law) 6
Continental Europe Law System (Civil Law) 7
Differences between the United Kingdom Copyright Traditions and Continental Europe Copyright Traditions 7
Future Impacts of Brexit Process the UK Copyright Laws 10
Brexit and the EU’s Copyright Harmonisation Project 12
Exceptions to Copyright Protection 14
Conclusion 17
Bibliography 19

Answer: Introduction Continental Europe Legal System (“Civil Law”) and the United Kingdom (“Common Law”) Legal System are amongst one of the prominent legal systems being followed in the United Kingdom. However both of...


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Details: - Mark: Not available | Course: Intellectual Property Law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 4996 | References: Yes | Date written: December, 2018 | Date submitted: February 19, 2019 | Coursework ID: 1052

Question: Assignment Title: “The International Legal Regime Against Drugs Has Enabled Drug Trafficking Organisations To Flourish.”

LW886: Transnational Criminal Law, University of Kent

Table of Contents
Introduction 3
Transnational Criminal Law on Drug Trafficking 4
Transnational Laws on Corruption, Money Laundering and Drug Trafficking 4
Human Rights and the Transnational Regulatory Framework on Drug Trafficking 5
The International Legal Framework on Drug Trafficking 6
Problems with the International Drug Policy 7
Obsolete Provisions on Regulation of Drug Trafficking 7
Enforcement of International Drug Trafficking Laws 9
Criminal Intelligence 9
The Perspective and Response of the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on the Challenges in Combatting Drug Trafficking 10
Relationship between Development of International Drug Control Regimes and the Flourishing Drug Trafficking Organisations 11
Critical Approach 13
Conclusion 15
Table of Cases 17
Table of Legislation 17
Bibliography ........................................................................................................................ 18

Answer: Introduction According to the United Nations (UN), drug trafficking refers to the engagement in the manufacture, distribution and purchase of the substances, which are prohibited by any legal regime. Article 4 of...


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Details: - Mark: Not available | Course: Criminal Law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 5434 | References: Yes | Date written: December, 2018 | Date submitted: February 19, 2019 | Coursework ID: 1051

Question: "The Problem of Piracy and Intellectual Property Rights.”

LW933: Intellectual Property and Industrial Practices, University of Kent

Table of Contents
Introduction 3
The Definition of the Piracy 4
Types of Piracy 5
Effects of Piracy 7
Protected Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) as a Combating Method 10
Benefits of IPR 12
Disadvantages of IPR 13
Methods to Prevent Piracy 14
Different Approaches 16
Recent Cases 16
Recommendations 17
Conclusion 19
Bibliography 21

Answer: Introduction In the modern era of business, the piracy is a huge issue for the large multinational business organisations across the world. The piracy problem appears when an individual or organisation takes...


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Details: - Mark: Not available | Course: Intellectual Property Law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 5382 | References: Yes | Date written: May, 2018 | Date submitted: February 19, 2019 | Coursework ID: 1050

Question: “The Court of Justice’s approach to free movement of workers and freedom of establishment promotes not so much an internal market as a “market without rules”’ [AG-Tizzano] Discuss. Mark 65%

London School of Economics, LL232 Law and institutions of the European Union

Answer: With regards to the free movement of workers contained in Article 45 TFEU and freedom of establishment as in Article 49 TFEU, one may strongly contend that the Court of Justice’s (ECJ)...


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Details: - Mark: 65% | Course: European Union Law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 1812 | References: No | Date written: March, 2015 | Date submitted: August 16, 2018 | Coursework ID: 1049

Question: Critically discuss the hierarchy of sources of EU law. In your answer please refer to legal comment and any other sources of EU law you consider appropriate.

Graded 2.1 - Word Count: 1964 (excluding bibliography and footnotes)

Answer: The ECJ in Costa held that “By contrast with ordinary....” Consequently, the European Union has legal personality and (as put in Van Gend ) ‘constitutes a new legal order in international law’....


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Details: - Mark: Not available | Course: European Union Law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 1964 | References: Yes | Date written: October, 2014 | Date submitted: August 16, 2018 | Coursework ID: 1048

Question: ‘The test for Article 34 TFEU is very simple. It is whether, in practice, an import is excluded from the domestic market. That is as it should be.’ Discuss.

London School of Economics, LL232 Law and institutions of the European Union

Answer: Article 34 TFEU states: Quantitative restrictions on imports and all measures having equivalent effect shall be prohibited between Member States. The test outlined by Article 34 is evidently broad in terms of...


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Details: - Mark: 64% | Course: European Union Law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 1715 | References: No | Date written: March, 2015 | Date submitted: August 16, 2018 | Coursework ID: 1047

Question: In Hunter v Mann (1974) Boreham J said that a doctor is under a duty not to disclose voluntarily information which he, the doctor, has gained in his professional capacity, save in very exceptional circumstances. However, in practice, it seems that the circumstances in which information about a patient may be disclosed to others is very far from exceptional.’

Critically discuss this statement, with reference both to relevant cases and legislation. 75%

Answer: The duty of confidentiality cannot be an absolute obligation, Siegler argues that preserving it may constrict good administration in hospitals, there must be a degree of flexibility as to all. Scholars like...


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Details: - Mark: 75% | Course: Medical Law | Year: 1st | Words: 1448 | References: No | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: May 06, 2018 | Coursework ID: 1045

Question: ‘The challenging questions about medical confidentiality do not, however, lie in establishing a general duty of confidence, or expectation of privacy, but in determining what amounts to “very exceptional circumstances” justifying breach of that duty.’ (Brazier and Cave, Medicine Patients and the Law).

With reference to this statement critically discuss the extent to which exceptions to the duty to keep confidences raise challenges for the medical profession. 75%

Answer: It is without a doubt that there is no challenge in establishing a general duty of confidence especially in the area of medical law, confidentiality has its roots traced back to the...


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Details: - Mark: 75% | Course: Medical Law | Year: 1st | Words: 1836 | References: No | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: May 06, 2018 | Coursework ID: 1044


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