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Question: “[The] ultimate achievement of the Land Registration Act 2002 lies in its ruthless maximisation of rational legal order, an aim which is symbolised by the statutory vision of an electronic register of virtually indefeasible titles, transact able by automated dealings and guaranteed by the state. Under this tightly organised regime, estate ownership, as constituted by the register record, becomes a heavily protected phenomenon, leaving little room for the operation ‘off the record’ of some ancient and pragmatic principle based on sustained possession.”

(Gray K. and Gray S., Elements of Land Law 5th ed (OUP 2009) pp. 182-3)

Discuss.

Answer: The Land Registration Act (LRA) 2002 has been, “heralded…as ‘a conveyancing revolution.’” It seems Grey agrees with this statement; however, not everyone shares this view. Dixon states, “The [LRA] 2002 has been...


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Details: - Mark: 66% | Course: Land law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 2048 | References: Yes | Date written: March, 2011 | Date submitted: April 22, 2012 | Coursework ID: 732

Question: “Overriding interests are a significant gap in the comprehensiveness of the land registration system.”

Stevens and Pearce, “Land Law”, 3rd Edn. 2005 p.71

Discuss this view, with reference to decided cases and the changes to the registered land system implemented by the Land Registration Act 2002.

Answer: In order to discuss this view, it is necessary to explore the development of the land registration system with the introduction of the Land Registration Act 2002, and how the subject of...


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Details: - Mark: 66% | Course: Land law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 2404 | References: Yes | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: January 10, 2011 | Coursework ID: 630

Question: Write an analysis of Part 9 and Schedule 6 of the Land Registration Act 2002

Answer: Rousseau’s extravagant discourse has successfully expressed the traditional approach to the laws of adverse possession. It is a well-established principle, which has become a chief exponent of the provision that ultimately the...


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Details: - Mark: 66% | Course: Land law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 1932 | References: Yes | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: October 20, 2008 | Coursework ID: 145

Question: ‘The history of property law is the history of the protection of wealth?’ Discuss.

Answer: Throughout this essay I shall be concentrating on the area of property law concerning copyright. I will look at how this area of law evolved throughout history and in analysing the reasons...


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Details: - Mark: 66% | Course: Land law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 1782 | References: Yes | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: October 20, 2008 | Coursework ID: 144

Question: 'Land Law 1, Assessed Course Work Problem.'

Answer: Anthony, a bone fide purchaser (BFP), acquired the registered title in fee simple of number 11, and should take free, or at least be aware, of any interests held in the land...


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Details: - Mark: 66% | Course: Land law | Year: 1st | Words: 2028 | References: Yes | Date written: May, 1998 | Date submitted: February 16, 2009 | Coursework ID: 217

Question: Jim Hawkins purchases from Mrs Dunraven the fee simple in Hispaniola, a spacious property with large grounds located in Petertone- super- Michael, a quiet Glamorgan village. The title is registered.

When Hawkins moves in he discovers that William Bones, his neighbour, is claiming that he (Bones) has a right to cross the rear garden of Hispaniola. When Hawkins questions him as to proof of this, Bones replies and that he and his family have been doing so for many years and have always had an informal agreement with the owners of Hispaniola to do so

In the far corner of Hispaniola’s grounds, is a small cottage, Benbow Cottage and Hawkins subsequently discovers that Mrs Miggs, Mrs Dunraven’s cousin, hold a ten year lease of these premises

To the other side of Hispaniola, lies ‘Pieces of Eight’ a thriving antique business owned by Jonathan Silver, who is claiming that Hispaniola is subject to a covenant prohibiting business use. Hawkins, who has considered using at least of Hispaniola as luxury holiday lettings is dismayed by this

The main reason for Mrs Dunrven’s sale of Hispaniola was that she had ended her relationship with her boyfriend, Livesy. Livesy is claiming that he paid the deposit when Mrs Dunraven purchased Hipsaniola and is now seeking to regain at least some of this money

Advise Hawkins as to whether and on what basis he is bound by any of the above claims.

Grade B, University of London
LLB, 2nd year, Land Law

Answer: This question requires us to advise Hawkins as to the remedy against the relevant rights claimed by different parties after he purchased Hispaniola. The parties are respectively Mrs Miggs, Bones, Silver and...


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Details: - Mark: 65% | Course: Land law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 3470 | References: Yes | Date written: February, 2014 | Date submitted: April 23, 2014 | Coursework ID: 863

Question: ‘Whether as a result of a sale of the land or otherwise, beneficial co-owners of land are all too frequently denied the chance to use the land itself and are forced instead to accept the monetary value of their interest.’ Do you agree?

Answer: Co-ownership disputes involve a difficult balancing exercise between two parties who both have legitimate rights in land. On the one hand, it may be necessary to for an order of sale to...


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Details: - Mark: 65% | Course: Land law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 1869 | References: No | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: April 24, 2011 | Coursework ID: 676

Question: 'The doctrine of adverse possession has no place in twenty-first century England and Wales, and it is a good thing that the Land Registration Bill seeks to marginalise it.' Discuss.

Answer: At present, there is widespread public concern and some judicial disquiet about the apparent ease with which it is possible to acquire title to land by adverse possession. Advance possession is possession...


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Details: - Mark: 65% | Course: Land law | Year: 1st | Words: 1557 | References: Yes | Date written: February, 2002 | Date submitted: October 20, 2008 | Coursework ID: 141

Question: Brief Summary: This question requires that you advise parties as to their rights in respect to property owned by a landlord. Furthermore you are instructed to explain how their rights/interests might be protected in the event of the landlord selling the property. The full question (case study) is included with the full answer for download.

Answer: Norris, Maria and Bill have rented Rita’s property . In order to advise the tenants whether they have rights and how to protect them, first we shall discuss whether the tenants hold...


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Details: - Mark: 64% | Course: Land law | Year: 1st | Words: 2171 | References: Yes | Date written: February, 2009 | Date submitted: February 11, 2010 | Coursework ID: 588

Question: ‘The rise and fall of the doctrine of equity of redemption mirrors the importance of mortgages and land to the English ruling classes.’ Discuss.

Answer: Used in exceptional circumstances, the equity of redemption was initially a timid response to a common law that \\\"construed mortgage transaction “strictly and unsympathetically\\\" . Yet the use of this doctrine rapidly...


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Details: - Mark: 64% | Course: Land law | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 1971 | References: No | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: February 20, 2009 | Coursework ID: 417


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