Home > English Legal System

English Legal System

Question: Q.1 (a) Why is it necessary for the judiciary to interpret statues? (B) Discuss the methods available to the judge for this task.

Answer: Every year parliament passes several statutes. The meaning of the law in the case of the statutes should be clear and explicit; (achieving this task can be a problem at times). In...


Read more of the answer →

Details: - Mark: 63% | Course: English Legal System | Year: 1st | Words: 1421 | References: No | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: February 19, 2009 | Coursework ID: 338

Question: ‘Judges may use the new context of the Human Rights Act 1998 to develop their own common law principles concerning human rights.’

Discuss and specify:
a) What is meant by the new context of the Human Rights Act 1998?
b) Why and how judges may develop the common law in the context of breach of confidence and the Human Rights Act 1998.
Illustrate your answers by reference to cases decided after the Act came into force.

Answer: Breach of confidence, as defined by the Oxford Dictionary of Law, is either ‘the disclosure of confidential information’, or ‘failure to observe an injunction granted by the court to prevent this. The...


Read more of the answer →

Details: - Mark: 63% | Course: English Legal System | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 2029 | References: No | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: October 15, 2008 | Coursework ID: 93

Question: Critically examine one aspect of the reforms of the Criminal Justice System suggested in the government White paper ‘Justice for all’.

Answer: This White Paper follows the review of the Criminal Justice System by Lord Justice Sir Robin Auld\'s (hereafter L.J.Auld), which considered practices and procedures in the Criminal Courts with a view to...


Read more of the answer →

Details: - Mark: 63% | Course: English Legal System | Year: 1st | Words: 2598 | References: Yes | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: October 14, 2008 | Coursework ID: 92

Question: Are conventions more than mere habits and do they serve a useful purpose?
Give relevant examples.

Answer: According to Sir Ivor Jennings, conventions “provide the flesh which clothes the dry bones of law” . Although this may be an over enthusiastic metaphor, it illustrates the wide recognition and appreciation...


Read more of the answer →

Details: - Mark: 63% | Course: English Legal System | Year: 1st | Words: 2003 | References: No | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: October 14, 2008 | Coursework ID: 90

Question: Q3. Evaluate the changes that have occurred to the structure of the legal profession over the last ten years in Britain and develop an argument for the future fusion of solicitors and barristers.

Answer: “To the rest of the world, the English legal profession is a very strange species indeed. Most countries manage to do with one kind of lawyer. We ...have two.” The modern divided...


Read more of the answer →

Details: - Mark: 63% | Course: English Legal System | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 2051 | References: Yes | Date written: February, 2003 | Date submitted: October 13, 2008 | Coursework ID: 26

Question: The English legal system has four main sources:
• Statutes / Acts of Parliament
• Legislation
• Common Law
• European Union Law (EU)

Which source has the most influence on the English legal system?

1st year LLB (Hons) at ARU – confirmed assessment result – 62%

Answer: In comparison, the English legal system and the traditional English breakfast are robust, consistent and all-encompassing due to the harmony of their various components. What is the most influencing factor that underpins...


Read more of the answer →

Details: - Mark: 62% | Course: English Legal System | Year: 1st | Words: 2527 | References: Yes | Date written: October, 2015 | Date submitted: May 02, 2016 | Coursework ID: 963

Question: What is meant by a legal system? What does a legal system contain and what is its purpose?

Answer: A legal system is the mechanism for creating, interpreting and enforcing the laws in a given jurisdiction. “A rule of conduct established and enforced by the authority, legislation, or custom of a...


Read more of the answer →

Details: - Mark: 62% | Course: English Legal System | Year: 1st | Words: 738 | References: No | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: February 19, 2009 | Coursework ID: 354

Question: Consider the arguments for and against having a written constitution.

Answer: A constitution is a set of rules and principles which determines the relationship between those who govern and those who are governed. It dictates who is in authority and governs the relationships...


Read more of the answer →

Details: - Mark: 61% | Course: English Legal System | Year: 1st | Words: 1327 | References: No | Date written: Not available | Date submitted: February 20, 2009 | Coursework ID: 436

Question: Are tribunals merely an appendage to the ordinary courts of law or an integral part of the English Legal System.

Answer: It has become the case that over the course of the 20th century an ever-increasing number of tribunals have come into existence alongside the ordinary civil courts, dealing with a wide variety...


Read more of the answer →

Details: - Mark: 61% | Course: English Legal System | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 3153 | References: Yes | Date written: March, 2003 | Date submitted: February 19, 2009 | Coursework ID: 352

Question: In interpreting statutes and the Common Law, the judiciary are creating the law rather than simply acting as adjudicators. Discuss.

Answer: Montesuieur’s De L’Esprit des Lois 1748 put forward the theory of separation of power which identified three functions of the state; Legislative, Executive, Judicial. To simplify the usefulness of Montesuieur’s theory is...


Read more of the answer →

Details: - Mark: 61% | Course: English Legal System | Year: 2nd/3rd | Words: 2025 | References: Yes | Date written: January, 2003 | Date submitted: February 19, 2009 | Coursework ID: 346


Page 5 of 6« 2 3 4 56 »

New user?

Registering is fast
and easy

Welcome back

Gain access

  1. Register with us
  2. Pay for instant access
  3. Or submit 3 pieces
    of your work for
    free access

Categories

Adobe Reader is required to access all coursework & essays. (pdf)
PayPal handles payments on our behalf. All major credit cards and currencies accepted.
A PayPal account is not nessesary.